Some thoughts on WordPress 5.0

WordPress Logotype

WordPress 5.0, also called “Bebo”, has been released recently. I think there never has been an update before that had to deal with so much criticism. Many people were alarmed, because the release date on December 6th felt a little rushed, with only a few days of notice beforehand. Also, the new editor, Gutenberg, still has a lot of Accessibility issues, although the WordPress Accessibility team and the Gutenberg developer team worked hard to eliminate as many problems as possible.

From my personal view as a web developer, I would advise against updating to WordPress 5.0 too quickly. I would suggest waiting at least until version 5.0.1 is out. Usually, after a release of a major update there will be bugfixes coming up in a short amount of time and the bigger problems will be eliminated shortly after the initial major release.
You don’t have to worry that your WordPress installation will update automatically to 5.0, since the auto-updates only work for minor releases (unless you have altered the configuration yourself).

WordPress 5.0 is not a security update, and the previous version 4.9.8 should continue to receive further security updates if needed, so there’s no big reason to update right away. If you’re using Wordfence, you will get alerts that your WordPress version is out of date, but in this case, it’s just an information – you can read their posting on this topic here.
Also, many themes that use their own layout builders for the content of pages and posts, still have compatibility issues with the newest version of WordPress.

There is a plugin called “Classic Editor“, which will enable using themes that don’t yet support Gutenberg. It is planned to be supported until 2021.

There is no need for you to panic, and you don’t have to rush things. I would advise you to try out WordPress 5.0 and Gutenberg on a development install, where you can safely play around, test your site and get used to the new WordPress version.

I am sure that WordPress will continue to serve as an easy to use Content Management System and that 5.0 and upcoming versions will include great improvements.

Shades of Winter FilmFest to start on December 10, 2018 in Munich!

Shades of Winter FilmFest 2018 Poster - dates: Munich 10.12.2018; Vienna 11.12.2018; Salzburg 12.12.2018; Innsbruck 13.12.2018

Shades of Winter launches its first ever FilmFest – you will be able to watch 8 to 10 snow movies, for example Shades of Winter “Connects” or “Now or Never” by Nadine Wallner in various cities throughout Europe.

Also, meeting the athletes like Julia Mancuso, Nadine Wallner or Lorraine Huber will be possible at the tourstops.

 

The dates are:

FilmFest Munich
10.12.2018 – 19 Uhr
Filmtheater Sendlinger Tor

FilmFest Vienna
11.12.2018 – 19 Uhr
Stadtkino Wien

FilmFest Salzburg
12.12.2018 – 19.30Uhr
Mozartkino Salzburg

FilmFest Innsbruck
13.12.2018 – 19 Uhr
Metropol Multiplex Innsbruck

-> http://www.shades-of-winter.com/filmfest/

Welcome to the relaunched mizzi.at!

MIZZI Logo

You have reached mizzi.at and a lot has changed here.

This website was started in 2006 by me, Stephanie Jagl-Posch. The aim was to support female action sports athletes by providing them with a platform where their news, photos and videos got shared.

I ran a personal blog separately, where I wrote about my own experiences as an outdoor enthusiast and amateur athlete.

In 2017, I was not happy with mizzi.at and my personal blog in their current form anymore. I was also looking for a place to share stuff about my job in the field of web development.

After taking mizzi.at offline and going on a hiatus from 2017 to 2018, I finally came to the conclusion that I wanted to strive towards creating a collective home for support for female action sports athletes, for my personal blog as well as for insights into the life of a web developer.

So here we are – I hope you enjoy your stay on my website!

Who is Burli?

Burli, the campervan, parking in front of a mountain in Spain

After getting infected with the camper virus by our dear friends Pachers on tour, we bought our first campervan in 2015, together with Romans parents.
The campervan had been named “Burli” by the previous owners and the name stuck with us.

Burli, the campervan, parking on the camping municipal of Le Pin Sec
Burli 1 on the Camping Le Pin Sec.

After 2 years together with Burli, we got the chance to upgrade and buy another, also used but newer, campervan.

Burli, the campervan, parking in front of a mountain in Spain
The new Burli enjoying the view in the Pyrenees in Spain.

My favourite button in Chrome DevTools: Pretty print!


Click to enlarge

A very practical option in Chrome DevTools is to show minified JavaScript files in their unminified, human-readable version. After opening up DevTools (STRG or APPLE +ALT + I), go to “Sources”, select the JavaScript File you wish to inspect. If it’s minified, DevTools will offer you the “Pretty print” (or “Format”) Button at the bottom below the code window, which looks like two curly brackets. Et voilà – the code will be displayed in an easier to read format!

WooCommerce – How to make the product quantity input field accessible

Screenshot of a code editor window with some PHP code visible

If you wish to improve the accessibility of the WooCommerce cart page, you may need to add a label to the product quantity input. To properly associate the label with the input, the input needs an ID.

Sadly, the used function woocommerce_quantity_input doesn’t come with the option to add an ID.
The solution is pretty simple though: There is a template for this input field, which you can copy to your own theme directory and alter.

The solution:

The path of the original file is:
/wp-content/plugins/woocommerce/templates/global/quantity-input.php
Copy it to your theme folder, for example:
/wp-content/themes/mytheme/woocommerce/templates/global/quantity-input.php

Then alter it like so:

<label for="<?php if ( isset($input_id) ) { echo esc_attr( $input_id ); } else { echo 'cartquantity'; }?>" class="screen-reader-text">
  <?php _e( 'Quantity', 'woocommerce' ); ?>
</label>

<input type="number" step="<?php echo esc_attr( $step ); ?>" min="<?php echo esc_attr( $min_value ); ?>" max="<?php echo esc_attr( $max_value ); ?>" name="<?php echo esc_attr( $input_name ); ?>" value="<?php echo esc_attr( $input_value ); ?>" title="<?php echo esc_attr_x( 'Qty', 'Product quantity input tooltip', 'woocommerce' ) ?>" class="input-text qty text" size="4" pattern="<?php echo esc_attr( $pattern ); ?>" inputmode="<?php echo esc_attr( $inputmode ); ?>"
id="<?php if ( isset($input_id) ) { echo esc_attr( $input_id ); } else { echo 'cartquantity'; }
?>" />

 

Now you can pass an ID to the input field by adding the argument input_id to the woocommerce_quantity_input function:

$product_quantity = woocommerce_quantity_input( array(
  'input_name' => "cart[{$cart_item_key}][qty]",
  'input_value' => $cart_item['quantity'],
  'max_value' => $_product->backorders_allowed() ? '' : $_product->get_stock_quantity(),
  'min_value' => '0',	
  'input_id' => "cart[{$cart_item_key}][qty]"
), $_product, false );

 

Why did you have to go and make things so complicated?

You may wonder why I used a variable for the ID. The reason for this is the cart page: Here you may have multiple products, which all have this quantity input field next to them. If we used a simple string as an ID, we would have multiple elements with the same ID, which is not semantically correct HTML and hinders screen readers from finding the correct input to associate the label with.

 

Thanks to Kathy aka helgatheviking for the helpful comment which led me to this solution.

Simple image modifications using Imagemagick in the shell

Screenshot of a code editor window with some PHP code visible

During the We Are Developers Conference in Vienna this year, I heard an interesting talk about “Habits of Efficient Developers”, held by Daniel Lebrero (the slides from this talk can be found on his website).

One of the key take-aways for me was that efficient developers automate all the things… well, at least the tasks they do over and over again.
Of course, I also have tasks that come up in nearly every project, so I have been thinking about a way to automate those tasks.

One of the first tasks that I chose to enhance was simple image modifications. I often need to do minor adjustments to images and don’t want to fire up Photoshop for that. If it’s just resizing, I’ll simply use the Preview app on Mac OS X, but placing a rectangular image on a square background is something that the Preview app can’t do.

So I came up with the idea to use a command line tool for this task – Imagemagick.

I installed Imagemagick with the help of Homebrew:
brew install imagemagick

Next, I needed a command for placing my image onto a square background, StackOverflow to the rescue!

magick convert -background white -gravity center /Users/stjagl/Desktop/originalfile.png -extent 500x500 /Users/stjagl/Desktop/squarefile.png

 

That’s it. In the timespan that would be needed to start up Photoshop, my image convertion will already be done.